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Sisters With Transistors (Virtual Screen Room)

Directed by Lisa Rovner. Narrated by Laurie Anderson. Documentary. English. Cert PG. 90 minutes

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Fri 23 April // 18:00
Sat 24 April // 18:00
Sun 25 April // 18:00
Mon 26 April // 16:00
Tue 27 April // 18:00
Wed 28 April // 18:00
Thu 29 April // 18:00
Fri 30 April // 18:00
Sat 1 May // 18:00
Sun 2 May // 18:00
Mon 3 May // 18:00
Tue 4 May // 18:00
Wed 5 May // 18:00
Thu 6 May // 18:00
Fri 7 May // 18:00
Sat 8 May // 18:00
Sun 9 May // 18:00
Mon 10 May // 18:00
Tue 11 May // 18:00
Wed 12 May // 18:00
Thu 13 May // 18:00
Fri 14 May // 18:00
Sat 15 May // 18:00
Sun 16 May // 18:00
Mon 17 May // 18:00
Tue 18 May // 18:00
Wed 19 May // 18:00
Thu 20 May // 18:00
Fri 21 May // 18:00
Sat 22 May // 18:00

Tickets: £9.99

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Narrated by legendary multimedia artist Laurie Anderson, Lisa Rovner’s superb Sisters with Transistors showcases the music of and rare interviews with female electronic pioneers Clara Rockmore, Delia Derbyshire, Daphne Oram, Éliane Radigue, Maryanne Amacher, Bebe Barron, Suzanne Ciani, Pauline Oliveros, Laurie Spiegel, and Wendy Carlos. As Rovner’s documentary demonstrates, these women—many of whom were classically trained musicians, brilliant mathematicians, or a combination of both—relished the freedom of electronic music, even as they were discriminated against because of their gender and because of their chosen medium. (More often than not, these biases intersected: Ciani, who was asked to score 1981’s The Incredible Shrinking Woman—a vehicle for Lily Tomlin, written by Jane Wagner—by a female executive, had to wait nearly 20 years until another woman was in charge of a studio to get another such offer.) Through their inventiveness and rebellion, these trailblazers’ music went on to influence musicians working in a variety of genres, and proved the worthiness of going electric. Sisters with Transistors is an essential primer for those interested in discovering this vital, oft-overlooked history but also offers plenty of pleasures for crate-digging experimental music obsessives who know the BBC Radiophonic Workshop’s output like the back of their hand. Contemporary musicians, such as Holly Herndon and Kim Gordon, also offer insights into their forebears’ indelible music and their personal significance.
 
 
This film contains a sequence of flashing lights which might affect customers who are susceptible to photosensitive epilepsy.